From The Editor

EDITORIALS

In a far-reaching speech this week that went way beyond the confines of official cash rates and inflation adjustment, Reserve Bank governor Adrian Orr laid out possibilities for a new and fairer global economy. It was remarkable, not least because...

We lost my mother very recently and in the gentle processes of the following week as we prepared for her funeral we were very aware of the extraordinary strength and contribution women of her generation made in their turbulent...
“I would like to assure you that Paul Walden has been treated no differently to any other property owner in similar circumstances nor has he been given any preferential treatment.”  This was Auckland Council chief executive Stephen Town’s response to...
It’s official.  Waiheke is profoundly dissatisfied with its relationship with the Auckland supercity to which it was a bartered bride in the 1980s and whose fate under Rodney Hide’s monolithic 2010 supercity successor Auckland Council has not been a...
Biased is always something that someone else is being; language from the upset four-year-old who wailed “you’re always being mean to me” at an intractable parent and got to guilt their way out of some of the consequences. It’s a...
Stormwater and its ferocious ravages on Waiheke’s essentially hilly terrain has troubled our minds a lot in the last 18 months.  The sight of trucks worth millions standing in stormwater up past their windows in Tahi Road yards in March...

For the first six or seven years that I knew Jacinda Ardern, I would have been fairly certain that no-one could take a bad photo of her. She was grace under fire, even on the devastating evening in 2014...
“The privatisation circus is back in town,” says Waitemata councillor Mike Lee as what appears to be a money-crazed Auckland Council launches a sale of every public asset that’s not nailed down, along with vast amounts more that one...
So far, my Plastic Free July resolutions have yielded a cotton bag hung in the pantry to accumulate bread bags and random soft-plastic wrappings which will go into the Ostend supermarket’s useful bin, a lively conversation with a young...

Resolutions are at least a sporting attempt at generating new and hopefully more useful personal behaviours and the week after the solstice – corresponding as it does to the midwinter New Year in our parent European culture – felt...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.