From The Editor

EDITORIALS

  Shadow work – not the Jungian dumpster diving into the dark of your own soul which has the same name but the big, insidious hole in our lives when we are, all unknowingly, working for someone else, and for...

Just before the summer, Auckland Council officials descended on the Waiheke Local Board and announced public consultation for Local Parks Management Planning or, as it is now lovingly referred to in official circles, Waiheke’s LPMP.   Specifically, we are being...

Time is precious but we seldom treat it as such unless (like James Bond) we are staring death in the face or having one of those sand-through-the-hourglass epiphanies that can come at the end of a run of –...

By now, even the briefest summer visitor will have noticed that Waiheke has too much traffic for its roads and its public transport isn’t exactly a good fit either. This bursting-at-the-seams atmosphere is a phenomenon in small destinations that...

Welcome to Waiheke. We hope you get to notice the blazing pohutukawa of all sizes around every corner, that masterful castle on the evening sand with a silhouette like a medieval city and the small-scale-ness of our villages and...

In the dappled, welcome shade of one of Waiheke’s most beautiful overhanging pohutukawa, I’m selecting matching stones for a small, slim under-two-year-old to consign to the rising tide with an impressively well-formed overhand style. After which he will trot...

This column may well disturb some people and – even if you have managed to keep your composure through serpentine queues, endemic delays and general overcrowding – your next ferry trip to Waiheke may be a little worse for...

Councillor for Waitemata and Gulf Mike Lee says he is appalled at the decision to hit Waiheke commuters with further parking charges at Matiatia.  Cr Lee said he was deeply concerned that, as the elected Councillor for the inner...

Clearly I haven’t been nearly plain enough these last two years about my Waiheke-centric dissatisfactions with Auckland Transport’s management of Pier Two in the downtown ferry basin.   At this moment, it looks as if more delays, ever-present queues and...

Usually, whenever one forms a shiny new possibility in the world – of an ubiquitous kindness, as I did  last week in this column, for example – what shows up next is all the stuff that isn’t kindness and...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.