From The Editor

EDITORIALS

I spent last weekend wrestling with an eight-foot tree root.  By dark on the first day, it had become obvious that it was a scion of a macadamia tree stump still three feet away from the laboriously dug trench in...
Throughout Project Forever’s exhaustive report on the future of tourism on Waiheke, Covid hangs like a spectre, haunting each question and statistic with its new and potent impact on residents’ and business confidence. Had the surveys been conducted, say, three...

So how did we get to be on the UN’s mat for a shameful lack of housing for our citizens and the wiping out of internationally recognised human rights to adequate housing – to which we actually subscribe? In the...
Scratch the surface of Waiheke and one of its first, and potentially most disturbing, traits you reveal tends to be a constant battle over the concept of ownership – that longevity and settlement incur on the individual a proportionately...

Only now, in the throes of this fourth Covid lockdown in 18 months, am I coming to grips with my somewhat tangled relationship with gardens and gardening.   My mother and, later, mother-in-law, were both magnificent gardeners, who – given...

“Epidemiological stupidity” isn’t a phrase that trips off the tongue easily – and, before the events of the past 20 months, would have had most of us reaching for the Scrabble dictionary. But with the hindsight of a raging pandemic,...
If our earlier level 4 lockdowns felt eerie, with the lucky of us almost sleepwalking into domestic housewifery, nature walks and having our children surprise us, those pauses and the mesmerising change from busy lives at least allowed us...
As Ashley Bloomfield and Jacinda Ardern filed into the Beehive theatrette to deliver Tuesday evening’s hammer blow confirmation of the country’s level 4 response to our first community Covid case in nigh-on half a year, I was at my...

So, the planet has blown the whistle and it’s game on. We either pull ourselves together and get points on the board or we find ourselves at the bottom of the table, supplanted on the podium and replaced in...
As kids on long drives to summer holidays, we used to count ghost trees. Singing along to Abba or the Carpenters, eye-spying or counting sequential number plates were possibly less macabre, but nigh-on half a century later, not as memorable. Dutch...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.