From The Editor

EDITORIALS

They were there about to board the bus at the top of Goodwin Ave – masked and be-suitcased, travel cards at the ready. Round midday on Sunday. It was only notable because the bus hadn’t really pulled over into its...
Early Wednesday morning, an Isuzu NQR rolled off the ferry at Kennedy Point – a rather prosaic moment for what’s quite a pioneering achievement for Waiheke. The truck marks the first ever electric vehicle to be added to Auckland Council’s kerbside...

I’ve got a lot of time for John Campbell. He might take an extraoooordinary time to produce some of his remaaaarkable questions in that rich, oh-so mellifluous tone, but he does inject a large dose of journalistic passion into Breakfast...

Talking to a Wellington colleague wise in the ways of sclerotic bureaucratic practices, I recently outlined the perfunctory and displeasingly short opportunity for the Waiheke community to assess the draft Waiheke Area Plan’s vision for Waiheke between now and...

Election 2020 will go down in history either way, but team five million is taking a fairly overwhelming hit as we stagger to reclaim the composure and thoroughness of our first bout with the disease.  While the Covid-19 virus –...

On Tuesday, the Guardian reported our much-admired director general of health taking a Covid-19 test to show us that those long swabs and spine curling grimaces are really not so bad. It was, at least, less painful than tackling...
The America’s Cup has suddenly sailed over the horizon. This past week has seen a notable rise in coverage, from Team New Zealand vogue-ing for the TVNZ cameras as they were put through their PR exercises and American Magic’s Defiant...
orce of nature. Full disclosure, she was once upon a time my landlady – but more importantly for this story, she’s the reason why you still sometimes follow a bus around Waiheke with a huge butterfly painted on its rear. That...
It’s not easy being told you’re average – but there it is in black and white. 46.7. That’s me. Smack bang in the middle of page eight’s colourful graphic – and setting the groundwork for the next 35 pages-worth of the...

The tanker driver’s withering smirk didn’t require a response. Regular readers may recall his last water delivery coincided with the heavy downpours which broke summer’s drought – simply down to misfortune on our part, I’d thought. Last week’s, though, followed...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.