From The Editor

EDITORIALS

Towering over the clipped entrance to the museum at Claris on Aotea/Great Barrier Island is the rather wonderful Tiri buoy. Once the mooring for the piratical DJs aboard the original off-shore Radio Hauraki, this sculpture was refurbished a couple of...

Clearly, we are at a watershed point in human civilisation.  I’d like to think that, standing on a fairer, more inclusive and generous planet 30 years from now, I’d be looking back with affection and gratitude on this time. That...

Sometimes, reporting on Auckland Council’s relationship with its least-favoured island is like watching a birthday party game of whack-a-mole – a frenzied seethe of children on a sugar high grabbing for the hammer to pummel down every upstart idea...
It’s far better to beg forgiveness than have to ask permission – that’s the Waiheke way. Or so I’ve heard more than a few times this past week. This go-getting mantra is the reason why we’ve got a smart new white...
Austerity – as in “difficult economic conditions created by government measures to reduce public expenditure” – arrived in New Zealand in the 1980s. It was cemented into our banking law in 1989 and almost immediately generated an atrocious spike...

Little hones the mind as to humanity’s precarious position on this Earth quite so much as a raging pandemic and science’s desperate quest for a solution. “Life must go on” has taken on far more urgency as society’s catch-cry as...
There were flaws built into MMP as we embraced it in 1993 after an election in which Labour won 41 percent of popular votes and Social Credit 20 percent but  National, with 39 percent, ruled untrammelled because it got...
When one of the more politically minded folk you know tells you they are seriously considering spoiling their ballot this year, you know that all’s not well in the democratic people’s republic of Waiheke. Truth be told, amid the exhaustion...
The trouble with the celebrity culture we’ve stumbled into this past few decades is that it’s a passive spectator sport. Sound and fury that plays to the gallery but essentially signifying nothing. One-upmanship writ large with glittering dollar stakes...

They were there about to board the bus at the top of Goodwin Ave – masked and be-suitcased, travel cards at the ready. Round midday on Sunday. It was only notable because the bus hadn’t really pulled over into its...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.