From The Editor

EDITORIALS

It began with one Swedish schoolgirl in a yellow rain jacket and when the Guardian Weekly broke the story of angry schoolkids striking to demand action on climate change, the leitmotif to society was ‘I want you to panic’.Greta...
Actually, Auckland hasn’t belonged to Aucklanders for a long time, probably since a single council bureaucrat in 2007 wiped our City of Sails logo off the slate and Auckland became some sort of golden goose for a New Zealand...
Mercy on us.  A capital gains tax has been proposed for our benighted country and so far, the wrath of Jove has not smitten us from the register of global approval.  Note to opposition leaders, even Stuff calls out...
There are fairly obvious reasons why Theresa May’s Britain is going one way with a Huawei high-speed 5G technology network and New Zealand is going another. And none of them have anything to do with Wellington picking the US...
 Shadow work – not the Jungian dumpster diving into the dark of your own soul which has the same name but the big, insidious hole in our lives when we are, all unknowingly, working for someone else, and for...

Just before the summer, Auckland Council officials descended on the Waiheke Local Board and announced public consultation for Local Parks Management Planning or, as it is now lovingly referred to in official circles, Waiheke’s LPMP.  Specifically, we are being...

Time is precious but we seldom treat it as such unless (like James Bond) we are staring death in the face or having one of those sand-through-the-hourglass epiphanies that can come at the end of a run of –...
By now, even the briefest summer visitor will have noticed that Waiheke has too much traffic for its roads and its public transport isn’t exactly a good fit either. This bursting-at-the-seams atmosphere is a phenomenon in small destinations that...

Welcome to Waiheke. We hope you get to notice the blazing pohutukawa of all sizes around every corner, that masterful castle on the evening sand with a silhouette like a medieval city and the small-scale-ness of our villages and...

In the dappled, welcome shade of one of Waiheke’s most beautiful overhanging pohutukawa, I’m selecting matching stones for a small, slim under-two-year-old to consign to the rising tide with an impressively well-formed overhand style. After which he will trot...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.