From The Editor

EDITORIALS

There were a few elephants in the room when Waiheke’s new local board members were sworn in at a ceremony at the Ostend War Memorial Hall to open a term when Waiheke, even more than the rest of democracy-starved...

There was something ponderous and rather disturbing about the pre-election charm offensive by Auckland Council when it exhorted citizens to vote in this month’s local government election. We were even invited to admire its perspicacity in hiring a young woman...

Three lonely barstools berm-stranded at the top of Goodwin Ave. Yup, I’ll have those, I thought. They graced my shack in Frank Street for a few years and then, when I moved round the corner to a bar-free kitchen, they...
So said the cheerful resting actor in his high-viz Auckland Transport vest in the now redundant bus-stop at the top end of Oneroa. The reason I knew he was an out-of-work thespian is because I’d already seen the casting call...
By midday on Saturday, voting will have closed and a high-stakes term in local governance will be set in place. Voting papers must now have to be handed in at the Waiheke Service Centre in Belgium Street or at Oneroa’s...
“Can’t we just stick to the shambles that we’ve got already?” It’s been my favourite comment of a week in which I’ve got increasingly annoyed at not being able to land on a solution to the interminable issue of our...
Council staff have stepped up in the first 18 months of a pilot project to trial greater devolvement of decision-making to the Waiheke Local Board, according to an Auckland Council report. Rachael Butler and Jesse Allpress inventoried community, board and...
A raft of council planning processes which will “fold” (aka homogenise) and lock in Waiheke’s future character and aspirations during the term of the next Waiheke Local Board emerged as a major island issue at Waiheke Radio’s local government...

To everyone who made the Great Gulf News Trolley Derby such a success, thank you on behalf of all of us at Gulf News. There are dozens of people listed at the back of this week’s 16-page souvenir lift-out without...
Gran died on her 102nd birthday — a typically neat departure, faintly resonant of the flourish with which she’d finish off a particularly difficult contract while playing her favourite card game, bridge. But it was only while constructing her eulogy...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.