From The Editor

EDITORIALS

Walk in, turn left… “Two Peroni and a peanut slab, please”… then go find a seat at the front and set my mind to the Herald’s Kropotkin crossword. Over the past 16 years, this has been my routine for the...

Public scrutiny of a proposal which would (among other worrying changes) increase the speed limit on Auckland’s inner harbour from 12 to 18 knots closes this Friday. The city’s appalled yachting fraternity is belatedly gathering to fight a review of...

Gosh, we love our dogs on Waiheke. There are 1112 of them on the island, according to the latest council numbers. That’s up 69 pooches from last year – an increase of around six percent, way above Auckland’s 1.4 percent...
As a yachtie, I raised and lowered quarantine flags punctiliously in new ports for years and woe betide any of us on the ocean sailing routes who did not observe, to the letter, the rules to protect borders against...
The America’s Cup is a strange beast. As ghastly as the egos of some of the millionaire and billionaire syndicate bosses are as they wave their metaphorical wedges of cash at each other, and as tone deaf as some of...
About the time a bellicose Donald Trump was lighting a bonfire under the mob that rioted into the inner sanctums of the US Capitol, I was picking up David Attenborough’s latest book, a  self-described witness statement from a man...
Remember, remember the fifth of November… Remember? For Waiheke’s Kate Tomson, she can’t forget it. Because that’s the day she came face-to-face with the harsh realities of New Zealand’s fragile Covid-free status. Kate works in the city. She grabs a coffee...

‘How many years does it take to become a Waihekean?’ has always been a wistful question frequently asked by relative newcomers. It’s unanswerable but I can say now – in the security of having carved a house and regenerated...

“First time on the market in 22 years!” the listing screams. “A rare gem…spectacular views…”  So far, so normal for a Christmas season TradeMe property listing on Waiheke – but this slice of the island comes with baggage, and Heritage with...
The months before Christmas are some of our loveliest of the year for their unexpected, lancing strokes of sunlight, landscapes still lightly rainwashed and the sea winter-clear and endlessly varied. At the end of the first Covid year, it all...

Liz Waters, Editor of The Gulf Newas

About Liz Waters

After a career which started in the newsrooms of the New Zealand Herald and Northern Advocate, Liz Waters and former husband David Waters built the 42-foot ketch Pendragon in Whangarei. They then spent four years sailing her round the world, crossing the Indian Ocean and rounding the Cape of Good Hope.

The trip involved four trans-Atlantic crossings, and shore time in such far flung places as St Helena and Bahia in Brazil as well as the West Indies, Bermuda and the Azores and, on the return voyage from Britain, the Panama Canal, the Galápagos Islands and French Polynesia.

They completed the circumnavigation in 1977, restored a derelict sailing scow and, after the birth of the first of their three daughters, bought shares in Waiheke’s newspaper.

Waiheke in the feisty 1980s was their next adventure.

Liz took over sole ownership in 1994 and since then Gulf News has continued its tradition of in-depth, professional reporting on local issues, picking up its fair share of awards along the way.

Liz sees a strong local newspaper that gives in-depth coverage of the issues that affect it’s community as a key factor in helping a region maintain its identity and the engagement of the whole community in its own decision making. 

Staying true to the paper’s long heritage of being driven by journalistic endeavour rather than commercial imperative is something she holds dear.

“We have a job to do. That is what we owe people and that is what we offer advertisers – a newspaper that is a must read in the community because it canvases all those issues that are important to people who live here.”

As with any newspaper, she says, “ you’re only as good as last week’s issue”.

Liz’s love of sailing continues with the 32-foot classic Woollacott boat that she bought as a derelict hull and restored eight years ago.